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  • Adapting the Visual Arts Standards to Make Your Lesson Plans Come Alive!

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 08/21/2019 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    Launched in 2014, the National Visual Arts Standards are part of the National Core Arts Standards. The Standards—written to be instructional, assessable, and aspirational—have endless possibilities to deliver curriculum in a variety of settings. Learn from three veteran K-12 art educators (who have all served on the NAEA Board of Directors) as they share their journeys and methods for effectively utilizing the Standards in facilitating challenging, engaging, developmentally-/age-appropriate units and lessons that provide deep investigation, critical thinking, problem solving, and student artist voice and choice. Gain new perspective as they share the Standards' impact on their work at the school, district, and state levels.

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    Adapting the Visual Arts Standards to Make Your Lesson Plans Come Alive!
    Wednesday, August 21, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Launched in 2014, the National Visual Arts Standards are part of the National Core Arts Standards. The Standards—written to be instructional, assessable, and aspirational—have endless possibilities to deliver curriculum in a variety of settings. Learn from three veteran K-12 art educators (who have all served on the NAEA Board of Directors) as they share their journeys and methods for effectively utilizing the Standards in facilitating challenging, engaging, developmentally-/age-appropriate units and lessons that provide deep investigation, critical thinking, problem solving, and student artist voice and choice. Gain new perspective as they share the Standards' impact on their work at the school, district, and state levels

    Laura Milas

    Laura Milas, MA, BFA, NBCT
    Art Educator, Hinsdale Central High School, Hinsdale, Illinois

    Laura Milas is a Visual Art Educator at Hinsdale Central High School where she teaches AP Art History, AP Studio Art, Drawing, and Painting. She has served as NAEA Western Region Vice President and on National Standards Assessment Writing Teams. An Illinois Art Education Past President, Newsletter Editor, and Youth Art Month Chairperson, Laura has been honored as the IAEA Art Educator of the Year and has been inducted as an IAEA Distinguished Member. A graduate of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she received its Distinguished Alumni Award in Art Education.

    Bob Reeker

    Bob Reeker, BA, Education; Masters in Educational Administration
    K-5 Visual Art Educator, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, Nebraska Adjunct Instructor, Nebraska Wesleyan University

    Bob Reeker has held multiple roles in Lincoln Public Schools, including K-5 visual art educator, K-5 computer science specialist, and K-5 assistant principal. He is also an adjunct instructor at Nebraska Wesleyan University where he teaches elementary art methods. Serving on the NAEA Board of Directors twice, he is the NAEA Western Region Vice President and was the NAEA Elementary Division Director. Bob has served his state organization, Nebraska Art Teachers Association, as Co-President, Youth Art Month Chair, and on a variety of committees.

    Linda Kieling

    Linda Kieling, MEd
    Art Educator, Clackamas High School,
    Clackamas, Oregon

    Linda Kieling is a veteran visual art educator, teaching students at the K-Graduate level over the course of 28 years. As an active leader, she has served NAEA as Middle Level Division Director, a member of the Professional Learning through Research working group, and on the Professional Materials Committee. Linda serves on the National Art Education Foundation Board of Trustees and is the incoming president of the Council for Art Education. Active in the Oregon Art Education Association, she has served as Middle Level Representative, Youth Art Month Chair, and is currently President-Elect. She has been recognized on many levels for her work, including receiving the NAEA Middle Level Art Educator Award of the Year and NAEA Distinguished Service Within the Profession Award. Linda is a published author and exhibiting artist.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Motivating the Unmotivated: Addressing Apathy in the Visual Arts Classroom

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Do you struggle with student apathy in your classroom? This webinar will help you motivate students and have them engage with you in the learning process. Presenter Christopher Sweeney will share tips and tricks from his 23-year teaching career for addressing apathy through agency, group projects, classroom and school climates, and the learning environment. He will also discuss how art mixes traditional media with new and upcoming ones—such as 3D printing, coding, and biodesign—to create an integrated curriculum of art and design technology. Sweeney believes that by using interactive mediums, even the most apathetic students can become engaged.

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    Motivating the Unmotivated: Addressing Apathy in the Visual Arts Classroom
    Wednesday, July 17, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Do you struggle with student apathy in your classroom? This webinar will help you motivate students and have them engage with you in the learning process. Presenter Christopher Sweeney will share tips and tricks from his 23-year teaching career for addressing apathy through agency, group projects, classroom and school climates, and the learning environment. He will also discuss how art mixes traditional media with new and upcoming ones—such as 3D printing, coding, and biodesign—to create an integrated curriculum of art and design technology. Sweeney believes that by using interactive mediums, even the most apathetic students can become engaged.

    Christopher Sweeney

    Christopher Sweeney is a graduate of the University of the Arts, Philadelphia College of Art and Design with a BFA in fine arts/painting and drawing. He also received his MA from the University of the Arts in 2012. As a student, Sweeny received awards including the Ernest W. Greenfield Annual Award in Painting and the Peter J. McCahill Memorial Award in Art Education. He was named the 2016 Outstanding Secondary Art Educator by the Pennsylvania Art Education Association and the NAEA Art Education Technology (AET) Interest Group’s 2019 Outstanding Teacher of the Year. Sweeny is an ambassador for MakeyMakey, Chibitronics, and Morphi, as well as a fellow at Ultimaker 3D Printer's Pioneer Education program.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • A STEAM Makerspace in YOUR Classroom!

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Science, technology, engineering, art, and math—knowledge in these fields will take our students far. And, the ways to give them this knowledge can be engaging and fun! Join STEAM specialist and educator Tim Needles as he shares creative lessons and approaches for every experience and education level when incorporating STEAM in the art room. This webinar will outline the fundamentals of STEAM and share a variety of technologies and concepts from old school ideas—light painting, upcycling, and cardboard—to emerging technologies such as digital drawing, 3D printing, augmented reality, coding, and robotics. Learn about the various ways STEAM lessons can cover everything from timing to environment to authentic project-based learning. Whether you’ve never tried teaching a STEAM lesson or you’re a full-time makerspace educator, this webinar will have something inspiring for you!

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    A STEAM Makerspace in YOUR Classroom!

    Wednesday, June 5, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Science, technology, engineering, art, and math—knowledge in these fields will take our students far. And, the ways to give them this knowledge can be engaging and fun! Join STEAM specialist and educator Tim Needles as he shares creative lessons and approaches for every experience and education level when incorporating STEAM in the art room. This webinar will outline the fundamentals of STEAM and share a variety of technologies and concepts from old school ideas—light painting, upcycling, and cardboard—to emerging technologies such as digital drawing, 3D printing, augmented reality, coding, and robotics. Learn about the various ways STEAM lessons can cover everything from timing to environment to authentic project-based learning. Whether you’ve never tried teaching a STEAM lesson or you’re a full-time makerspace educator, this webinar will have something inspiring for you!

    Tim Needles

    Tim Needles is an artist and educator from Port Jefferson, New York. His work has been featured on NPR and in the New York Times, as well as the Columbus Museum of Art, the Norman Rockwell Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. He has been teaching art and media in Smithtown, New York for 20 years and is an Adobe Education Leader and educational consultant for the Japan Society. He has received numerous awards for his teaching, been featured on various media broadcasts, and is active on Twitter and Instagram @timneedles and Facebook @TimNeedlesArt.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Art Educators as Artists

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Is it possible to maintain a sense of balance between the creative roles of teacher and artist? Do you face an ongoing struggle with living what seems like two separate lives? Join in this webinar to explore some of the challenges many art teachers have in finding time, energy, and space to make their own work and discover successful strategies that can be employed to help maintain harmony and success within each of these worlds. Be ready to share your challenges and the approaches that have helped you with your personal art practice as we delve into how it is possible to establish a relationship between teaching and creating art by understanding how these two worlds can inspire and inform one another.

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    Art Educators as Artists

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Is it possible to maintain a sense of balance between the creative roles of teacher and artist? Do you face an ongoing struggle with living what seems like two separate lives? Join in this webinar to explore some of the challenges many art teachers have in finding time, energy, and space to make their own work and discover successful strategies that can be employed to help maintain harmony and success within each of these worlds. Be ready to share your challenges and the approaches that have helped you with your personal art practice as we delve into how it is possible to establish a relationship between teaching and creating art by understanding how these two worlds can inspire and inform one another.

    James Rees, MFA

    James Rees, while always maintaining his studio practice, has taught art for over 24 years at the college and high school levels. He has received awards from the National Art Education Association and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation, as well as several residencies and fellowships throughout the United States. He is an Art 21 Educator and has worked as a mentor teacher for School of the Arts Institute of the Teacher Institute at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. As an artist, he currently exhibits regionally and nationally.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Design Thinking in the K-12 Art Room

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Design thinking is a systematic, iterative process that maximizes the potential for student-devised creative solutions. Learn how a K-12 art educator successfully implemented design thinking in her classroom over the past 3 years, leading students in meaningful, creative problem-solving experiences. Join in the discussion and become inspired to use design thinking methodologies in your classroom!

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    Design Thinking in the K-12 Art Room

    Wednesday, April 10, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Design thinking is a systematic, iterative process that maximizes the potential for student-devised creative solutions. Learn how a K-12 art educator successfully implemented design thinking in her classroom over the past 3 years, leading students in meaningful, creative problem-solving experiences. Join in the discussion and become inspired to use design thinking methodologies in your classroom!

    Leslie Gould

    Leslie Gould has been a K-12 art teacher in upstate New York for the past 15 years and serves as an advisor for a chapter of the National Art Honor Society. She was selected as a local PBS Digital Innovator in 2016 and presented workshops at the annual NYSATA and NAEA conferences in 2016 and 2017. In summer 2018 she attended NAEA SummerStudio Design Thinking in Laguna Beach, California. At all levels, Leslie strives to align the curriculum with grade level units and standards as well as expose her students to a variety of experiences, including introducing them to art and artists from around the world. 

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: A Drone's Eye View [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Using readily available satellite imagery from an online mapping source, students can find an overhead view of their own community and turn it into map-like art. Trace the main lines and features, color realistically or use your imagination to turn it into a fantasy world or complete abstraction.

    In the centuries before the development of aircraft, map-makers relied on a largely imagined aerial perspective to depict their surroundings. Imagine what it would have been like to be some of the early air travelers and see the Earth from a perspective no one had ever seen it from before! To 20th century artists, being able to fly in a plane or view aerial photos opened up a whole new way to create landscape art. These artists coined the term “aeropainting,” and it appealed to realist and abstract painters alike.

    Looking down at one's environment from the sky, even tall buildings appear flattened and two-dimensional. Streets and highways form lines, and there's texture and a wide variety of color in fields, trees, and water. There's no horizon line, background, or foreground. The world becomes very abstract.

    Using readily available satellite imagery from an online mapping source, students can find an overhead view of their own community and turn it into map-like art. Trace the main lines and features, color realistically or use your imagination to turn it into a fantasy world or complete abstraction.

    **GRADES 3-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: Constructed Reed Sculpture [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Reed is an inexpensive and easy-to-use medium with diverse possibilities. This process demonstrates how reeds can be inserted into corrugated channels that will hold them in place and easily release them as well. For young artists who are experimenting and problem-solving in three-dimensional space, this process allows them to form and secure individual components and have the freedom to change their minds and rearrange their sculpture.

    The coiled material known to many western artists and crafters as “reed” does not come from a plant that grows along a riverbank, as one might think. Craft reed is cut from the inner core of the rattan vine, harvested from jungles in southeast Asia and processed into flat or round lengths. Wicker furniture and baskets are made predominately from reed.

    Commonly used for functional items, in the hands of a fine artist reed can be formed into highly innovative fiber sculpture.

    American artist Martin Puryear is well known for sculptures that merge modern art with traditional methods and materials, including rattan. Cambodian artist Sopheap Pich uses native materials to express the dark history of his homeland and his own experiences as a refugee in the form of woven sculpture. In addition, artist Nathalie Miebach weaves reed and other materials to bring art, mathematics, and science together by translating numerical and environmental data into woven pieces.

    Reed is an inexpensive and easy-to-use medium with diverse possibilities. This process demonstrates how reeds can be inserted into corrugated channels that will hold them in place and easily release them as well. For young artists who are experimenting and problem-solving in three-dimensional space, this process allows them to form and secure individual components and have the freedom to change their minds and rearrange their sculpture.

    GRADES 3-12 Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: Fiber Mesh Mash [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A staple for needle crafts, plastic mesh canvas becomes the base for a textural fiber and wire mash-up. A product familiar to anyone with needle craft experience is plastic mesh canvas. Commonly used as a foundation for creating designs with yarn, its rigidity makes it suitable for a variety of shapes, both flat and dimensional. An unconventional way to use plastic mesh canvas is to consider it a base for textural and dimensional fiber art.

    Fiber craft is perhaps the oldest art form there is, and, for a great deal of history, it has been synonymous with women's work. The women's movement of the mid-20th century helped bring a revolution in fiber as artists such as Sheila Hicks, Lenore Tawney, and Magdalena Abakanowicz experimented with highly dimensional and large-scale forms, abstraction, environmental art, and figurative sculpture.

    “Fiber” is a blanket term for a large variety of natural and synthetic materials including cotton, wool, synthetic cords, twine, thread, raffia, silk, fur, wire, and, of course, yarn. Beyond weaving, fiber art is created through knotting, coiling, pleating, lacing, crocheting, braiding, felting, quilting, casting, and many other innovative techniques.

    As an open-ended introduction to fiber art, this lesson provides students with a means to create a dimensional base structure. Once this substrate is in place, students follow their own path of exploration and experimentation, discovering the many ways fibers can communicate color, texture, and form.

    **GRADES 3-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: I, Robot [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    What would you look like as an android? It's a sci-fi selfie! This lesson plan gives students an opportunity to imagine themselves as bionic beings and create a "mechanical" assemblage from their own image.

    The genre of sci-fi art and illustration has paralleled the technology and literature of the past century. Brazilian artist Henrique Alvim Correa's illustrations for H.G. Wells' “The War of the Worlds” introduced the idea of alien robots. Mid-century, Isaac Asimov's "I, Robot” stories and the beginnings of space exploration inspired many artists to dream of futuristic societies and alien races. In the latter part of the 20th century, with the support of popular culture, innovations in computer programming, and the imaginations of artists such as H.R. Giger, mergers of humans and machines became virtual and the terms "cyborg" and "biomechanic" were coined.

    Starting with a dimensional outline of their own features, students use metallic foil, paints, and discarded electronic components to turn their image into science fiction selfies.

    **GRADES 3-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: Op Art Spinners [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Why settle for a manufactured spinner when you can take a one-of-a kind piece of art for a spin? In this lesson plan, students create their own hand-held “fidget spinners” as kinetic art — discs, gears, and designs that rotate around a center axis. When patterns and colors on multiple layers spin together, they can fool the eye and create colorful illusions. Take one for a spin!

    “Fidget spinners” became wildly popular because of their reputation as a concentration aid or a means of releasing stress and anxiety. In the same manner as a stress ball, they give the hands something to keep them busy. Op Art (short for Optical Art) is a movement that rose to popularity in the 1960s as a means of keeping the eyes busy.

    Optical illusions were not invented by scientists or optometrists but by artists who understand the workings of the human brain and eyes and how to trick them into believing they see something they don't actually see. A design that is completely stationery can appear to have movement as a result of carefully placed color and pattern.

    Art that is designed to incorporate motion is known as Kinetic Art, and Op Art is considered kinetic even if the motion is only illusionary.

    In this lesson plan, students create their own hand-held “fidget spinners” as kinetic art — discs, gears, and designs that rotate around a center axis. When patterns and colors on multiple layers spin together, they can fool the eye and create colorful illusions. Take one for a spin!

    **GRADES 3-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.