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  • Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Art Museums

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/01/2022 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [June 1, 2022 | 7pm ET] Join us for reflection on the trajectory of art museums in making authentic change in the realm of equity, diversity, and inclusion. Art museum educators have a unique opportunity and responsibility to foster meaningful, inclusive, and accessible learning experiences for K–12 learners. To enact this work, they continuously strive to deepen their understanding of the identities and needs of a diverse set of learners, prioritizing the needs of those who have traditionally felt the museum was not a place for them. In response, art museum educators have become very intentional about what (i.e., which artworks and which narratives related to them), how (i.e., the pedagogy), and who is involved in teaching, as well as how to approach and nurture relationships with schools. Museum educators are also committed to a continual process of reflection on and disruption of the ways that white supremacy culture informs the work they do with staff—including hiring, management, mentorship, team building, and retention.

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    Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Art Museums
    Wednesday, June 1, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers
     

    Join us for reflection on the trajectory of art museums in making authentic change in the realm of equity, diversity, and inclusion. Art museum educators have a unique opportunity and responsibility to foster meaningful, inclusive, and accessible learning experiences for K–12 learners. To enact this work, they continuously strive to deepen their understanding of the identities and needs of a diverse set of learners, prioritizing the needs of those who have traditionally felt the museum was not a place for them. In response, art museum educators have become very intentional about what (i.e., which artworks and which narratives related to them), how (i.e., the pedagogy), and who is involved in teaching, as well as how to approach and nurture relationships with schools. Museum educators are also committed to a continual process of reflection on and disruption of the ways that white supremacy culture informs the work they do with staff—including hiring, management, mentorship, team building, and retention.

    ​Laura Gomez

    Lillian S. Wells Associate Education Curator, NSU Art Museum
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Laura Gomez was born in Madrid, Spain. She received a BFA from Florida Atlantic University with a concentration in sculpture. She is the recipient of the 2016 Office of Undergraduate Research and Inquiry Grant and the Esther Saylor Rothenberger Endowed Scholarship for Humanities; she presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the spring of 2017. Gomez has worked at the University Galleries, FAU, as a galleries assistant and has been the project manager of Community Justice: The Black Panther Party & Other Civil Rights Movements and Home Mask Relations: A Social Project by Isabel Berglund, among other exhibitions. She has also been involved in museum education as a youth mentor for the Artist Mentorship Program from the University Galleries, FAU. Gomez is currently working in the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale as the Lillian S. Wells associate education curator, creating and organizing public programs and educational materials for the public.

    Sarah Boyd Alvarez

    Senior Director for Students and Educators, Art Institute of Chicago
    Chicago, Illinois

    Sarah Alvarez is the senior director for students and educators in the Department of Learning and Public Engagement at the Art Institute of Chicago. In this role, Alvarez oversees a comprehensive program of learning resources and opportunities for K–12 schools, including professional development programs and curriculum materials for teachers, school partnership programs, and museum-based and virtual experiences for students. Over the past 3 years, Alvarez has managed a holistic evolution of this work, centering shared inquiry, cross-cultural connections, and accessible, multimodal experiences for all learners, with priority for Chicago Public Schools.

    In addition to her specific activities at the Art Institute, where she has worked as an educator since 2001, Alvarez actively engages in citywide dialogue about high-quality, equitable art education experiences for Chicago students and has published various articles, essays, and curriculum modules related to art museum learning.

    Celeste Fetta

    Director of Education, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
    Richmond, Virginia

    For more than 20 years, Celeste Fetta has been active in the museum education space. She has served as the director of education at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) for the past 7 years. She also has experience with leading gallery education and adult programs at VMFA, in addition to playing an active role in the development of its 2020 Strategic Plan. Fetta was honored in 2018 as the Virginia Museum Educator of the Year by the Virginia Art Education Association for her contributions in the field and currently serves as the Southeastern Region Representative on the NAEA Museum Education Development Committee. She holds an MPhil in decorative art history from the University of Glasgow and a BA in art history from the College of William & Mary and currently resides in Richmond, Virginia, with her husband and two children.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Empowering Students Through Project-Based Learning

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/04/2022 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [May 4, 2022 | 7pm ET] If you’ve always wondered how to make art class important for the kids who don’t love to draw, this webinar is for you! Join three art educators and project-based learning (PBL) leaders from the DC metro area to explore PBL and why it is getting so much attention globally! Discover how PBL provides engaging opportunities for students to build real-world skills and learn content by focusing deeply on personal response, identity, and community impact. Learn why “doing art projects” doesn’t mean doing “PBL,” and gain easy, actionable steps to revise current projects to increase authenticity, engagement, and long-term impact—the starting points of PBL.

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    Empowering Students Through Project-Based Learning
    Wednesday, May 4, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers  

    If you’ve always wondered how to make art class important for the kids who don’t love to draw, this webinar is for you! Join three art educators and project-based learning (PBL) leaders from the DC metro area to explore PBL and why it is getting so much attention globally! Discover how PBL provides engaging opportunities for students to build real-world skills and learn content by focusing deeply on personal response, identity, and community impact. Learn why “doing art projects” doesn’t mean doing “PBL,” and gain easy, actionable steps to revise current projects to increase authenticity, engagement, and long-term impact—the starting points of PBL.

    Andrew D. Watson

    Fine Arts Instructional Specialist, Alexandria City Public Schools
    Alexandria, Virginia


    Andrew D. Watson, recipient of the 2015 Art Education Technology Outstanding Teacher Award from NAEA, is a leading arts educator. As the fine arts instructional specialist for Alexandria City Public Schools (ACPS), he supervises the curriculum and professional development of the ACPS art, music, and theater teachers. Watson regularly writes and speaks on issues involving design thinking, arts integration, creative careers, and STEAM education. He is a founding member of the Board of Directors for the Innovation Collaborative, the Fine Arts Steering Committee of the Virginia Department of Education, and previously served on advisory boards to the National Art Honor Society, the Smithsonian Institute’s National Portrait Gallery, Congressional STEAM Caucus, and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Watson was also the 2018 NAEA National Convention Coordinator.

    Jeff Lonnett

    Educational Specialist, Fairfax County Public Schools
    Alexandria, Virginia

    Jeff Lonnett is an educational specialist in Fairfax County Public Schools’s Advanced Academics Program. His primary focus is the growth and sustainment of PBL across the school district, preK through 12th grade. Lonnett has trained more than 6,000 teachers and administrators in PBL, who gain the ability to implement the model, refine practices, and raise awareness in their school communities. He started his career in art education, then worked to support new teachers by serving as a coach for FCPS’s induction program and led professional development on how to mentor and support novice teachers. Additionally, Lonnett has facilitated statewide professional development on PBL at James Madison University’s yearly Content Teaching Academy, at the Virginia Association for the Gifted’s yearly conferences, and has worked with the Kennedy Center through the CETA program. A 22-year educator, he is also an artist and illustrator. You can follow him on Twitter @JeffLonnett.

    Michelle Land

    Art Specialist, PBL County Support Teacher, Fairfax County Public Schools
    Alexandria, Virginia

    Michelle Land is an art specialist and PBL county support teacher for Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) in Alexandria, VA. She graduated from Maryland Institute College of Art with a BFA and an MAT. Her pedagogy revolves around student-centered learning and cross-curricular collaboration through a PBL approach. Putting theory to practice, she embeds PBL into her art lessons, fostering real-world skills while teaching content to her students. Land has published and presented extensively on STEAM and PBL for Spring Publishing Company, NAEA, Complex Adaptive Systems, and FCPS.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Teaching Media Arts: Exploring New and Emerging Approaches

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/06/2022 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [April 6, 2022 | 7pm ET] Explore various approaches to teaching media arts from a group of celebrated educators with affiliations from Adobe, ISTE, NASA, and the NAEA ArtEdTech Interest Group. We’ll share best practices and cover both traditional media arts approaches as well as new and emerging media. We will also share engaging project ideas using various technologies that can be applied in classes in both K–12 and college.

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    Teaching Media Arts: Exploring New and Emerging Approaches
    Wednesday, April 6, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers


    Explore various approaches to teaching media arts from a group of celebrated educators with affiliations from Adobe, ISTE, NASA, and the NAEA ArtEdTech Interest Group. We’ll share best practices and cover both traditional media arts approaches as well as new and emerging media. We will also share engaging project ideas using various technologies that can be applied in classes in both K–12 and college.

    Tim Needles

    Art and Media Educator, Author of STEAM Power
    Smithtown, NY 

    Tim Needles is an artist, educator, and author of STEAM Power: Infusing Art Into Your STEM Curriculum. He teaches art and media at Smithtown School District, NY, and is a TEDx Talks speaker. His work has been featured on NPR, in the New York Times, Columbus Museum of Art, Norman Rockwell Museum, Alexandria Museum of Art, Katonah Museum of Art, and Cape Cod Museum of Art. He is the recipient of ISTE’s Technology in Action and Creativity Awards, NAEA’s Eastern Region Art Educator Award, AET Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Rauschenberg Power of Art Award. Needles is a National Geographic–certified teacher, PBS Digital Innovator, a NASA Solar System Ambassador, an ISTE Arts and Technology and STEM PLN leader, NAEA ArtEdTech Interest Group leader, and Adobe Creative Educator and Education Leader Emeritus. He is active on social media at @timneedles.

    Matt Dombrowski

    Associate Professor, Emerging Media, University of Central Florida
    Orlando, Florida

    Matt Dombrowski is an associate professor of emerging media at the University of Central Florida’s School of Visual Arts and Design in Orlando. Dombrowski received the award for UCF Undergraduate Teacher of the Year and the Chuck D. Dziuban Award for Excellence in Online Teaching. His mission is to empower through creative practice while delivering arts and cultural impact to underserved communities. He serves as creative director of Limbitless Solutions, a nonprofit that inspires confidence and increases accessibility in the limb difference community through art-infused bionics. He leads in the creative development and production of expressive 3D printed bionic limbs, comics, and training games for children. His work has been featured by Adobe, Autodesk, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, GDC, SXSWEDU, and the Gates Foundation. Dombrowski strongly believes that the influences and implementation of digital art should be used to better our society and help positively shape its future.

    Jeanne Bjork

    Art Educator and Department Head Pewaukee High School
    Pewaukee, Wisconsin

    As a veteran educator, Jeanne Bjork’s goal is to connect her classroom to the world through outreach, travel, and community events, while helping her students envision their future through the study of visual arts and technology. Bjork has served as a state-level leader with the Milwaukee Area Teachers of Art (president, web designer); Wisconsin Art Education Association (WAEA; web and social media designer); and as a state and national presenter at WAEA, NAEA, Davis Publications’s Media Arts Intensive and ISTE Arts and Technology PLN Playground. She is a published author and photographer for both state and national publications. As a K–12 art team member, she helped design a curriculum that is thoughtfully infused with technology while still encouraging students to engage in curious play and creative investigation of media. She also is an artist, reader, traveler, knitter, cook/baker, gardener, and cyclist, whose many interests inform and inspire her teaching practice.

    Denise Wright

    STEAM Educator, Horry County Schools
    Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

    Denise Wright is a STEAM Educator for Horry County Schools in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. She is co-president of the International Society of Education STEM Professional Learning Network. She volunteers for NASA as Solar System Ambassador, started the community group Grand Strand Astronomers, and designs curriculum for NASA while serving on the Infiniscope Advisory Board. She enjoys integrating media arts into her STEAM curriculum.

    ​Kerry Parrish

    Art Educator Crystal Lake Central High School
    Crystal Lake, Illinois

    Kerry Parrish, an instructional coach and visual arts teacher, has been teaching for 25 years at Crystal Lake Central High School. After receiving her BA from University of Northern Iowa and her MA from North Central College, she became a School for Art Leaders graduate, class of 2016. Parrish currently serves as the secretary for the Illinois Art Education Association and is actively involved in arts advocacy. As a consistent presenter at local and national conferences, she shares her passion for collaboration, communication, and technology to help all educators fulfill their potential. Currently Parrish is teaching a master’s-level class about SEL and is also working to grow the Media Arts PLN at the state level to provide more professional development to high school educators throughout the United States. She believes that digital art is a great avenue to engage students in the arts!

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Community-Based Art Education: Making, Teaching, and Research With/in Community Settings

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/16/2022 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [March 16, 2022 | 7pm ET] Community-based art education (CBAE) projects can teach art skills, connect diverse groups around common themes, beautify spaces, heal unsettled communities, raise awareness of concerns of the disenfranchised, and celebrate community assets and cultures through a culturally responsive process. Join us for an introduction to a CBAE framework to connect educational institutions with their local communities while building sustainable partnerships through arts-based learning. Learn about conceptual, theoretical, practical, and research structures used to aid educators in developing, implementing, and assessing your own CBAE project.

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    Community-Based Art Education: Making, Teaching, and Research With/in Community Settings
    Wednesday, March 16, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Community-based art education (CBAE) projects can teach art skills, connect diverse groups around common themes, beautify spaces, heal unsettled communities, raise awareness of concerns of the disenfranchised, and celebrate community assets and cultures through a culturally responsive process. Join us for an introduction to a CBAE framework to connect educational institutions with their local communities while building sustainable partnerships through arts-based learning. Learn about conceptual, theoretical, practical, and research structures used to aid educators in developing, implementing, and assessing your own CBAE project.

    Pamela Harris Lawton

    Florence Gaskins Harper Endowed Chair in Art Education Maryland Institute College of Art
    Baltimore, Maryland

    Pamela Harris Lawton, a fifth-generation educator, is the Florence Gaskins Harper Endowed Chair in Art Education at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Her scholarly research revolves around visual narrative and intergenerational art learning in BIPOC communities. Her artwork is grounded in social practice; she seeks to illuminate contemporary issues, cultural traditions, and the stories of people affected by them. In 2019 she was an associate artist at the Tate Exchange in London and the Distinguished Chair Fulbright Scholar at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.  

    In addition to coauthoring Community-Based Art Education Across the Lifespan: Finding Common Ground, Lawton has published more than 25 journal articles and book chapters, 50 presentations, and 80 art exhibitions. Her artworks are in the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Tate Library’s artist book collection, Frederick Douglass Museum and Cultural Center, Florence and Eugene Myers Foundation, and the special collections of 10 universities.

    Margaret Walker

    Associate Clinical Professor, Art Education University of Maryland
    College Park, Maryland

    Margaret Walker has been an artist and educator in a variety of community, school, museum, and university settings in New York, Maryland, and Washington, DC. She taught studio art in New York City at Lexington School for the Deaf and in a community art school, and worked as a museum educator at the Isamu Noguchi Museum. Walker received her EdD in art and art education at Teachers College, Columbia University, and is currently the coordinator of the art education program at the University of Maryland.

    Walker’s research focus is on community-based art education, and she connects students with community members in Maryland and Washington, DC, to develop community-based artworks that explore themes of community and human experience. She recently cowrote Community-Based Art Education Across the Lifespan: Finding Common Ground, published by Teachers College Press in July 2019. Walker is a painter and mixed-media artist in the DC area.

    Melissa Green

    Artist, Museum, and Environmental Educator/Creative Community Engagement Designer
    Oregon

    Melissa Green is an artist, museum and environmental educator, college faculty member, and creative community engagement designer currently working with the University of Oregon and environmental conservation organizations. She is the former executive director of ArtReach Community Gallery with George Washington University and director of community partnerships at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. She has a passion for forging cross-cultural connections in art and transforming communities through creative, socially engaged, ecologically minded, and accessible place-making initiatives. During her time at ArtReach, the program was recognized with the Mayor’s Arts Award for Innovation in the Arts and developed creative engagement programs in Washington, DC, working with such organizations as the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery, the National Park Service, 11th Street Bridge Park Project, District Department of Energy & Environment, Art in Embassies, and the Office of the State Superintendent of Education.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Connecting With English Language Learners in the Visual Arts Classroom

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/02/2022 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [February 2, 2022 | 7pm ET] In second language acquisition, the integration of visual arts provides differentiated learning, bolsters confidence, and encourages students to appreciate their own cultures and heritages through experiential learning in a brave space. Discover how storytelling through individual journeys can help to empower English Language Learner (ELL) students and help them connect to personal identity.

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    Connecting With English Language Learners in the Visual Arts Classroom
    Wednesday, February 2 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers  

    In second language acquisition, the integration of visual arts provides differentiated learning, bolsters confidence, and encourages students to appreciate their own cultures and heritages through experiential learning in a brave space. Discover how storytelling through individual journeys can help to empower English Language Learner (ELL) students and help them connect to personal identity.

    Natalia M. Febo

    Museum Education Specialist, Smithsonian Latino Center
    Washington, DC

    Natalia M. Febo is a museum educator and a visual artist born and raised in Puerto Rico and residing in Washington, DC. She has more than 10 years of experience in the museum education field. Currently, she works at the Smithsonian Latino Center as the community engagement and volunteer coordinator. She is part of the team developing the first national Latino gallery at the Smithsonian. Previously, she worked as an arts integration educator at Carlos Rosario School International Public Charter School in Washington, DC, where she developed and cotaught arts integration programs for adult ELL and Spanish literacy classes. Febo holds an MA in museum studies from George Washington University and a BA in advertising and public relations with a minor in fine arts from the University of Puerto Rico. She is also a cake decorator who loves inventing in the kitchen and has a passion for illustrating food.

    Trinity Villanueva

    Executive Director, Public Art Reston
    Reston, Virginia

    Trinity Villanueva (she/ella) is a multidisciplinary artist, connector, and dynamic storyteller. Her inclusivity and compassion lie on the intersections of belonging and accessibility as she brings ancestral wisdom of the Kānaka Maoli, Taíno, and Ilocano. Villanueva hosted an Emmy award–winning show, originated a role in Paul Simon’s Broadway musical The Capeman, leveraged a multimillion-dollar marketing start-up, and founded an arts and culture department for the first adult charter school in the nation. Villanueva is the executive director for Public Art Reston, the cofounder of mixt collective, Kai Ākea, and the Tales From the 202 podcast. She is a content creator for the Institute of Anti-Racist Education and SchoolArts, and serves on the boards of directors for Art Education DC and NAEA. Most importantly, her resilience and love are cultivated through single motherhood to her son Kai.  

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • SEL Practices: Self-Care for Your Students and YOU

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/05/2022 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [January 5, 2022 | 7pm ET] Social–emotional learning provides a foundation for safe, positive learning and enhances students’ ability to succeed in school, careers, and life. Join Melissa Hronkin in this insightful webinar to learn mindful breathing, chair yoga, and other techniques that you can share with students and colleagues to help foster a culture of self-care in and out of the art room.

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    SEL Practices: Self-Care for Your Students and YOU
    Wednesday, January 5 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers
     

    Social–emotional learning provides a foundation for safe, positive learning and enhances students’ ability to succeed in school, careers, and life. Join Melissa Hronkin in this insightful webinar to learn mindful breathing, chair yoga, and other techniques that you can share with students and colleagues to help foster a culture of self-care in and out of the art room.

    Melissa Hronkin

    Art Educator Houghton Elementary School, Yoga Instructor and Wellness Advocate
    Houghton, Michigan

    Melissa Hronkin is an elementary art educator in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. She earned her 200-hour yoga teacher and mindfulness training certification from Breathe for Change, which focuses on teacher well-being and methods of implementing these tools in the classroom. She has continued to study through Mindful Schools and has worked to create a culture of teacher self-care at her school with colleagues. Hronkin holds a BFA from the University of Alaska Anchorage, an MFA from Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and an MA in art education from The Ohio State University.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Engage Your Students Through 3D Design

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/01/2021 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [December 1, 2021 | 7pm ET] Develop your 3D design program and engage students of all learning styles! This webinar features presenters from elementary, middle, and secondary visual arts programs who will share methods and strategies for including sculpture in your visual arts curriculum. Learn from experienced teachers who use sculpture to add breadth to their curriculum and connect to contemporary artists and concepts.

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    Engage Your Students Through 3D Design
    Wednesday, December 1 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers
     

    Develop your 3D design program and engage students of all learning styles! This webinar features presenters from elementary, middle, and secondary visual arts programs who will share methods and strategies for including sculpture in your visual arts curriculum. Learn from experienced teachers who use sculpture to add breadth to their curriculum and connect to contemporary artists and concepts.

    Thom Knab

    K–4 Art Educator, Dodge Elementary
    East Amherst, New York

    Thom Knab has been a K–4 art educator at Dodge Elementary, East Amherst, New York, since 1990. He earned his MS degree in art education from Buffalo State College in 1992. Currently serving as NAEA Past President, Knab also served as the NAEA Elementary Division Director (2015–2017), and NYSATA President (2013–2015). He received both the NAEA National and Eastern Region Elementary Art Educator Awards in 2018, was the 2018 NYS Art Educator, and is a 2020 inductee into the National Teachers Hall of Fame. He has been the keynote speaker at state and regional conferences, as well as the OATK12 Facebook group conference. Knab’s writing has been featured frequently in publications, including School Arts Magazine and NYSATA News. He is also an exhibiting artist.

    Debra Hannu

    Visual and Media Arts Educator and Curriculum Specialist, Duluth Public Schools
    Duluth, Minnesota

    Debra Hannu has served the Duluth Public Schools for over 30 years, both as a K–12 teacher of visual and media arts and as a curriculum specialist. With an extensive background and interest in curriculum and assessment, Hannu was part of the development team for both the National Standards in the Visual Arts and the Minnesota Academic Standards in the Arts. She has served in numerous leadership positions with Art Educators of Minnesota, most recently in conference planning. As a regional teacher leader with the Perpich Center for Arts Education, Hannu has teamed with colleagues to provide professional development opportunities regionally. She is a member of the 2019 cohort of the School for Art Leaders with NAEA and teaches art and movement methods to graduate education students at the College of St. Scholastica. Although she enjoys working with students and peers at all levels, Hannu’s heart is in middle school!

    Martin Loftus

    Visual Arts Director, Denver School of the Arts
    Denver, Colorado

    Martin Loftus attended Beloit College and received a bachelor’s degree in studio art as well as a master’s degree in teaching. Loftus has 25 years of experience teaching high school visual arts and has taught numerous national, regional, and local award-winning students. He is an experienced Advanced Placement teacher, reader, and table leader, and he also serves as a College Board consultant.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Organizing Student Art Exhibits for Maximum Success

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 11/03/2021 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [November 3, 2021 | 7pm ET] Presenting is one of the four processes (Creating, Presenting, Responding, Connecting) in the National Core Arts Standards and is described as “interpreting and sharing artistic work.” Exhibiting student artwork is an extremely important and exciting part of the artmaking process. For visual arts educators, however, exhibitions can be overwhelming and intimidating—especially with the new demands of our changing world. Join us to learn fresh ideas for creating successful exhibits that are easier for you and even more rewarding and engaging for your learners and your community.

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    Organizing Student Art Exhibits for Maximum Success
    Wednesday, November 3 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers  

    Presenting is one of the four processes (Creating, Presenting, Responding, Connecting) in the National Core Arts Standards and is described as “interpreting and sharing artistic work.” Exhibiting student artwork is an extremely important and exciting part of the artmaking process. For visual arts educators, however, exhibitions can be overwhelming and intimidating—especially with the new demands of our changing world. Join us to learn fresh ideas for creating successful exhibits that are easier for you and even more rewarding and engaging for your learners and your community.

    Patrick Reynolds

    Exhibitions Manager Alliance for Young Artists & Writers
    New York, New York

    Patrick Reynolds is an artist, writer, and publisher who serves as the Exhibitions Manager for the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, the nonprofit organization that administers the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. His work for the Alliance has included multiple virtual exhibitions with hundreds of award-winning student artworks, as well as presentations of student artwork at the Department of Education in Washington, DC; the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City; and the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art in Virginia Beach. Apart from his work with the Alliance, Reynolds has curated virtual and in-person exhibitions of contemporary digital art, and he runs the independent artist book label Beatrice.

    Rebecca A. Stone-Danahy

    Director, AP Art and Design, College Board
    Johns Island, South Carolina

    Rebecca Stone-Danahy is the director of AP Art and Design with the College Board. She has taught for 25 years, serving in a range of teaching positions from preK–12th grade in private and public schools. The latter part of her career has been spent in educational leadership focused on the visual arts. She also co-owns Pylstone, LLC, and cofacilitates and comoderates the NAEA webinar series. She is President of the North Carolina Art Education Association and a graduate student at Clemson University working on an EdD in educational systems improvement science.

    Jim Meyers

    CEO, Artsonia
    Chicago, Illinois

    Jim Meyers is the cofounder and CEO of Artsonia, the largest online art gallery of children’s artwork. Artsonia creates student digital art portfolios for millions of students worldwide.  

    Leah Maltbie

    Fine Arts Curriculum Coordinator
    Anchorage, Alaska

    Leah Maltbie is an art educator with an eclectic background. She has worked on both the Pine Ridge and Wind River Reservations with high-risk students. She graduated in 2013 with a master’s in art education from the University of Nebraska at Kearney. Her master’s thesis was on the neuroscience of creativity and how STEAM and art-based research art programs enhance the creative learning process. Maltbie has taught K–12 students with a variety of approaches, including choice-based art and TAB. Her most recent position has taken her to the vast landscaping state of Alaska. She is the fine arts curriculum coordinator for the Anchorage School District. Maltbie relates, “This is a dream position in a dream location. From teaching teachers to coordinating art shows and writing curriculum, this position is a culmination of a decade of teaching and a lifetime of wanting what is best for students. Now I get to provide the PD, support, knowledge, experience, and passion for art education to those in the classroom.”

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Not a Toolkit: Thinking With, Through, and Against Whiteness

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/06/2021 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [October 6, 2021 | 7pm ET] Three White members of an educator collective, formed around antiracist education and critical Whiteness studies, share their experiences and insight. “As a group, we talk, think, create, and denaturalize the ways that we are educated by and through whiteness—within our group and with others in our institutions and fields of practice. We have a shared commitment to doing this work with each other as a durational practice that allows us to create collaborative projects, revisit ideas, and hold each other accountable over time. We call ourselves ‘Not a Toolkit’ as a way of troubleshooting the one-off training, the objective-driven and quick-fix workshop, and the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) professional development model aimed at checking off boxes and responding to urgent news cycles around racist violence. Rooted in long-term, embodied, sloggy, and uncomfortable engagements with Whiteness, we will describe a messy history of doing this work and offer creative prompts for thinking with, through, and against Whiteness within each of our specific, non-replicable classroom communities.”

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    Not a Toolkit: Thinking With, Through, and Against Whiteness
    Wednesday, October 6 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers


    Three White members of an educator collective, formed around antiracist education and critical Whiteness studies, share their experiences and insight. “As a group, we talk, think, create, and denaturalize the ways that we are educated by and through whiteness—within our group and with others in our institutions and fields of practice. We have a shared commitment to doing this work with each other as a durational practice that allows us to create collaborative projects, revisit ideas, and hold each other accountable over time. We call ourselves ‘Not a Toolkit’ as a way of troubleshooting the one-off training, the objective-driven and quick-fix workshop, and the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) professional development model aimed at checking off boxes and responding to urgent news cycles around racist violence. Rooted in long-term, embodied, sloggy, and uncomfortable engagements with Whiteness, we will describe a messy history of doing this work and offer creative prompts for thinking with, through, and against Whiteness within each of our specific, non-replicable classroom communities.”

    Maya Pindyck

    Assistant Professor and Director of Writing Moore College of Art & Design
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

     
    Maya Pindyck is an interdisciplinary poet and educator. A recipient of a 2019 NEA Fellowship, she is the author of the poetry collections Emoticoncert (Four Way Books, 2016) and Friend Among Stones (New Rivers Press, 2009—winner of the Many Voices Project Award). Her visual and community-based work has been exhibited at the Milton Art Bank (Milton, PA) and in New York City at the Lewis Latimer House Museum, the Art in Odd Places Public Art Festival, chashama, the Governors Island Art Fair, and elsewhere. Pindyck earned her PhD in English education from Teachers College, Columbia University, and currently lives in Philadelphia where she is an assistant professor and director of writing at Moore College of Art & Design.

    Jessica Hamlin

    Clinical Assistant Faculty, New York University
    New York, New York  

    Jessica Hamlin is an assistant clinical professor in the Art+Education program at NYU. Her research interests include the intersections between contemporary art, critical pedagogy, and public education as well as a focus on critical multiculturalism and critical Whiteness studies in education. Before joining NYU, she worked in a range of nonprofit art and education organizations, including serving as the director of education for Art21 and education coordinator and gallery educator for Art in General. Hamlin has also worked in local government and as an advisor to school districts and community-based organizations. She coauthored the book Art as History, History as Art: Contemporary Art in the History Classroom (Routledge, 2009), has published articles in SchoolArts and Art Education as well as the ART21 Magazine, and has chapters forthcoming in several journals and books.

    ​Victoria Restler

    Assistant Professor, Educational Studies Rhode Island College
    Providence, Rhode Island

    Victoria Restler is an assistant professor of educational studies and director of the youth development master’s program at Rhode Island College. Her award-winning dissertation research engages arts-based methods to interrogate teacher evaluation and value. Recent articles include “Rubbing the Room: Tactile Epistemologies of Teacher Work” (2020) and “Countervisualities of Care: Re-Visualizing Teacher Labor” (2019). Restler’s current collaborative study explores institutional Whiteness through image archives, narrative research, and teacher workshops.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Maximizing Your Virtual, Hybrid, and Face-to-Face Classroom Management

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [September 1, 2021 | 7pm ET] Maximize your classroom management by working smarter, not harder! Explore virtual, hybrid, and face-to-face best practices, including adapting traditional classroom management to a hybrid model or learning new ways to create authentic, lasting relationships. Discover digital teaching tools to further your practice, both on- and offline. You’ll also learn how to create a positive and safe learning environment in your face-to-face classroom to bolster student ownership and engagement. Additionally, easy ways to utilize group contingency protocols to maximize your instructional time and overall efficiency will be shared.

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    Maximizing Your Virtual, Hybrid, and Face-to-Face Classroom Management
    Wednesday, September 1 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Maximize your classroom management by working smarter, not harder! Explore virtual, hybrid, and face-to-face best practices, including adapting traditional classroom management to a hybrid model or learning new ways to create authentic, lasting relationships. Discover digital teaching tools to further your practice, both on- and offline. You’ll also learn how to create a positive and safe learning environment in your face-to-face classroom to bolster student ownership and engagement. Additionally, easy ways to utilize group contingency protocols to maximize your instructional time and overall efficiency will be shared.

    Brittany Brinson

    Art Educator Rio del Valle Middle School
    Oxnard, California

    Brittany Brinson is an art educator with enthusiasm for classroom organization and management. Coming from an education and military background, Brinson has developed organization tips and tricks that have aided her in the art room for nearly a decade. She enjoys any opportunity to share and learn with other educators, especially in regard to increasing student ownership and ways to manage the sometimes chaotic spaces that form as a result of student engagement. Brinson strives to share her knowledge as inspiration for all teachers, so that educators everywhere can have the time and energy to continue doing what they love, the best way they can.

    Brooke Hunter-Lombardi

    College Board Consultant/Visual Arts Educator Arts & College Preparatory Academy
    Columbus, Ohio

    Brooke Hunter-Lombardi is an urban gardener and lover of backyard chickens and indoor bunnies. Her current body of work incorporates science, history, and storytelling through watercolor, mixed media, printmaking, book arts, assemblage, and ceramic sculpture. Teaching all age groups since 1994, she seeks to facilitate maximum learning: more books, more artists, more exploration, more inspiration, more techniques, and more ideas! Ms. H-L (as many students call her) currently teaches visual arts to talented and kind high school students at Arts & College Preparatory Academy (https://artcollegeprep.org).

    Melanie Holm

    Visual Arts Educator Arts & College Preparatory Academy
    Columbus, Ohio

    Melanie Holm teaches art with a focus on building skills, vision, student voice, and getting into “the zone” when making stuff. She travels and explores the outdoors, likes to fix things, and collects found objects for inspiration. Holm moonlights in an all-mom rock band (Trachete) and recently became a certified yoga instructor.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.