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  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/07/2023 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [June 7, 2023 | 7pm ET] Join us as we explore ways of advancing and reshaping the museum space and praxis toward racial literacy and radical equity and inclusion as it relates to cultural heritage informatics. We will critically examine (art) museum space and practices to unsettle racist and colonial design, looking to how museums can take the lead on antiracism and new ways of being. Drawing on critical race and decolonizing perspectives, we will critically examine (art) museum space and praxis to unsettle racist and colonial design.

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    Antiracist and Anticolonial Approach to Equity in Art Museums
    Wednesday, June 7, 2023 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Join us as we explore ways of advancing and reshaping the museum space and praxis toward racial literacy and radical equity and inclusion as it relates to cultural heritage informatics. We will critically examine (art) museum space and practices to unsettle racist and colonial design, looking to how museums can take the lead on antiracism and new ways of being.

    Michelle Bae-Dimitriadis

    PhD, EdD, MFA, MA, Teaching Credential, BFA, BS, BA, etc; Assistant Professor, Art Education, WGSS & Asian Studies, The Pennsylvania State University

    Michelle Bae-Dimitriadis is an assistant professor of art education; Asian studies; and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at the School of Visual Arts, The Pennsylvania State University. Her research addresses decolonizing, land-based art inquiry; transcultural feminist approach; and the potential value/importance of community-based art learning in the lives of immigrant/refugee youth. She established the UrbanWildcommunity educational program in Buffalo, New York, in collaboration with a local nonprofit refugee organization in 2012. Her research has been acknowledged with NAEA’s Manuel Barkan Award (2021), Eugene Grigsby Award (2020), Grace Hampton Lecture (2019), and Mary Rouse Award (2017). 

    Porchia Moore

    Doctorate: Library and Information Science and Museum Studies; Program Head; Museum Studies, University of Florida/Affiliate Faculty UF CAME

    Porchia Moore is the program head and director of museum studies at the University of Florida. She is a Laura Bush 21st Century Cultural Heritage Informatics Leadership Library fellow with the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Porchia is the codirector of The Incluseum and cocreator of The Visitors of Color project, and she previously served as project advisor for MASS Action and Museums & Race.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/03/2023 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [May 3, 2023 | 7pm ET] Learner-centered art education recognizes the potential of art education as an entry point for culture and connection through the lived experiences of a learning community. Join a panel of educators who explore curriculum and pedagogy at the center of learner inquiry using multimodal approaches centered on stories, context, and meaning-making.

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    Reimagining Art Education Curriculum Through Learner-Centered Inquiry
    Wednesday, May 3, 2023 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Learner-centered art education recognizes the potential of art education as an entry point for culture and connection through the lived experiences of a learning community. Join a panel of educators who explore curriculum and pedagogy at the center of learner inquiry using multimodal approaches centered on stories, context, and meaning-making.

    Amy Pfeiler-Wunder

    PhD, Professor of Art Education and Department Chair, Kutztown University

    Amy Pfeiler-Wunder is a professor of art education at Kutztown University, as well as the department chair and coordinator of the master of art education graduate program. She received her PhD in teaching and learning art from The University of Iowa. Her work examines the impact of intersectionality on one’s professional identity, with keen attention to views of learners and curriculum creation.

    Evan Thomas

    MA Art Ed; Dean of Equity, Inclusion and Belonging & Fine Arts Teacher

    A teacher of fine art at independent schools since 2009, Evan Thomas currently serves as the dean of equity, inclusion, and belonging at Blair Academy. An active member of NAEA, Evan is chair of the Independent School Art Educators Interest Group and is a member of NAEA’s Cultural Competency in Teaching and Leadership program.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/05/2023 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [April 5, 2023 | 7pm ET] What is inquiry? How do we encourage inquiry in our art rooms? Are inquiry and creativity connected? What does inquiry-based learning look like in the studio? Why is authentic inquiry important? Join us for answers to these and other questions as we discuss the research on, importance of, and relationship between inquiry and art education. The art education landscape is shifting to better support the emergent needs of contemporary learners. Pedagogies that embrace culturally responsive teaching, social–emotional learning (SEL), and trauma-informed teaching find commonality in student-centered, choice-based learning models. In these models, learners develop strategies for creating and using lines of inquiry to hypothesize, investigate, and solve problems. We will look at scaffolding inquiry to foster intrinsic motivation, feeding our students exploratory experiences which empower them to pursue their own independent line of inquiry, and supporting inquiry in various classroom situations. The presenters will share both research-based applications and real-world experience in preK–12 educational settings.

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    Unpacking Inquiry to Support Learners
    Wednesday, April 5, 2023 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    What is inquiry? How do we encourage inquiry in our art rooms? Are inquiry and creativity connected? What does inquiry-based learning look like in the studio? Why is authentic inquiry important? Join us for answers to these and other questions as we discuss the research on, importance of, and relationship between inquiry and art education. The art education landscape is shifting to better support the emergent needs of contemporary learners. Pedagogies that embrace culturally responsive teaching, social–emotional learning (SEL), and trauma-informed teaching find commonality in student-centered, choice-based learning models. In these models, learners develop strategies for creating and using lines of inquiry to hypothesize, investigate, and solve problems. We will look at scaffolding inquiry to foster intrinsic motivation, feeding our students exploratory experiences which empower them to pursue their own independent line of inquiry, and supporting inquiry in various classroom situations. The presenters will share both research-based applications and real-world experience in preK–12 educational settings.

    Michelle Ridlen

    NBCT; Art Educator/Fine Arts Content Leader

    Michelle Ridlen is a National Board–certified artist educator who has worked with students of all ages for more than 20 years. She currently works in the Francis Howell School District, St. Charles, Missouri, as a full-time high school art teacher focusing on ceramics and sculpture, as well as serving as the fine arts lead teacher, where she works with district K–12 teachers in music, art, and theater writing curriculum and providing professional development. Michelle has presented at numerous local and national conferences about curriculum including using inquiry-based learning. She is also a proud graduate of the 2017 NAEA School for Art Leaders.

    Jennifer Ferrari

    MEd, Art Educator, Lt. Job Lane Elementary School, Bedford, Massachusetts

    Jennifer Ferrari is currently an elementary visual arts teacher in Massachusetts. Prior experience includes a variety of preK–12 teaching roles in both the public and private sectors across the northeastern United States. She serves on the Teaching for Artistic Behavior (TAB) board of directors and as a regional leader for TAB Northeast. Notable publications and presentations include “Thinking Like an Artist” in School Arts magazine and “Empowering Student Leaders in the Choice-Based Art Room” at the 2022 NAEA National Convention in New York City.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/01/2023 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [March 1, 2023 | 7pm ET] Join us as we unpack the meaning and characteristics of an inclusive learning environment through art while uncovering a variety of pedagogical approaches and instructional strategies to build inclusive communities in your learning spaces. Learn firsthand how inclusive community building has helped students develop a stronger sense of belonging and how studying a community’s local history and its demographic landscape helps to expand understanding of inclusive learning. Come away with strategies to align art teaching resources with cultural competence in order to address issues related to diversity, social justice, and inclusion.

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    Building Inclusive Classroom Communities
    Wednesday, March 1, 2023 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Join us as we unpack the meaning and characteristics of an inclusive learning environment through art while uncovering a variety of pedagogical approaches and instructional strategies to build inclusive communities in your learning spaces. Learn firsthand how inclusive community building has helped students develop a stronger sense of belonging and how studying a community’s local history and its demographic landscape helps to expand understanding of inclusive learning. Come away with strategies to align art teaching resources with cultural competence in order to address issues related to diversity, social justice, and inclusion. 

    Tara Rousseau

    MA CSE; Art Educator, Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study Lab School at OISE, University of Toronto

    Tara Rousseau has been the visual arts teacher at the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study Lab School at University of Toronto since 2009. She has been on the board of NAEA’s LGBTQ+ Interest Group since 2017, and is serving the second of a 2-year term as Co-President of that group. Tara also has a background in journalism, and teaches both English as a second language and French.

    Yichien Cooper

    PhD, Lecturer, Washington State University Tri-Cities

    Yichien Cooper teaches at the Washington State University Tri-Cities. She currently chairs the Asian Art and Culture Interest Group. Her research interests include integrating arts curriculum, STEAM, mapping, data visualization, social justice, arts-based and narrative inquiry, AAPI, and mixed identity. She published six Chinese books on integrating arts and coedited Teaching Chinese Art.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/01/2023 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [February 1, 2023 | 7pm ET] Research in disability studies can help art educators reframe ways of engaging with disability issues. Join us as we explore the use of disability arts to engage learners in critical visual literacy and imagery production. We’ll also unpack critical approaches to language and decentering normalcy to create inclusive learning spaces.

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    Disabilities Studies and Art Education: Reframing Student and Teacher Engagement
    Wednesday, February 1, 2023 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Research in disability studies can help art educators reframe ways of engaging with disability issues. Join us as we explore the use of disability arts to engage learners in critical visual literacy and imagery production. We’ll also unpack critical approaches to language and decentering normalcy to create inclusive learning spaces.

    J. T. Eisenhauer Richardson

    Dual PhD Art Education and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, The Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor, Arts, Administration, Education, and Policy, The Ohio State University

    J. T. Eisenhauer Richardson is an associate professor at The Ohio State University in the Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy; chair of the graduate studies program; faculty director of the online Master of Arts in Art Education; and chair of the National Art Eduction Association’s Disability Studies in Art Education Interest Group. Their research and teaching reimagine art education through the expertise of disabled and neurodivergent artists and writers to reimagine spaces of learning for disability justice.

    Kelly Gross

    PhD; Assistant Professor of Art and Design Education, Northern Illinois University

    Kelly Gross, an assistant professor of art and design education at Northern Illinois University, is currently working on several research projects that focus on the intersection of art education, special education, and disability studies. Kelly is a former special education teacher and K–8 art teacher who has taught in New Orleans, New York City, and Chicago.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/11/2023 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [January 11, 2023 | 7pm ET ] There are many therapeutic possibilities of artmaking with youth, and your art room can be a healthy space for this to happen. Explore pedagogical practices and classroom structures through the lens of the mental health needs of all students, including developing a sketchbook practice for nonverbal communication and building a safe and trusting environment in the art studio. Discover new ways to address and support student behaviors that prevent engagement and joy in artmaking, such as perfectionism or lack of confidence. Sample project and activity ideas offering a range of therapeutic benefits to student artists in Grades K–8 will be shared.

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    Considering Mental Health Challenges in the Art Classroom
    Wednesday, January 11, 2023 | 7–8pm ET  
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    There are many therapeutic possibilities of artmaking with youth, and your art room can be a healthy space for this to happen. Explore pedagogical practices and classroom structures through the lens of the mental health needs of all students, including developing a sketchbook practice for nonverbal communication and building a safe and trusting environment in the art studio. Discover new ways to address and support student behaviors that prevent engagement and joy in artmaking, such as perfectionism or lack of confidence. Sample project and activity ideas offering a range of therapeutic benefits to student artists in Grades K–8 will be shared.

    Faye Kendall

    BFA, MFA Graduate Level Coursework in Art Therapy for Art Teachers; Art Teacher, Sonoma Country Day School, California

    Faye Kendall is an artist and art educator living and working in Sonoma County, California. Faye has focused on social–emotional learning and character education integration in her K–8 art classroom and served as an art program director and curriculum writer for several nonprofit organizations over the past 14 years. She also creates fiber arts, ceramics-based sculpture, and wearable art.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/07/2022 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [December 7, 2022 | 7pm ET] Join us as we explore nurturing gifted and talented students in Title I schools. Come away with curriculum examples, lessons addressing community-specific needs, and fresh theories and philosophies of teaching that can help lead your students to take creative risks to help them grow and develop in the arts. Presenters will share dual approaches to expanding student progress, equipping you with enhanced support to help students find their voices as artists.

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    Pushing Boundaries: Nurturing Gifted and Talented Art Students
    Wednesday, December 7, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Join us as we explore nurturing gifted and talented students in Title I schools. Come away with curriculum examples, lessons addressing community-specific needs, and fresh theories and philosophies of teaching that can help lead your students to take creative risks to help them grow and develop in the arts. Presenters will share dual approaches to expanding student progress, equipping you with enhanced support to help students find their voices as artists. 

    Jess Perry-Martin

    MAe, AP Reader, GATE certified, Single Subject Art Credential; Art Educator, ArTES Magnet High School, San Fernando, California; and Lecturer, California State University, Northridge

    Jess Perry-Martin teaches art at ArTES Magnet High School in San Fernando; lectures at California State University, Northridge; and is an AP reader and Art21 educator. She is an NBC teacher and mentor who is passionate about arts education, advocacy, and equity for Title I students, and bringing contemporary art into the classroom. Outside of teaching, she’s a proud band and soccer mom, avid reader, occasional artist, and lifetime learner.

    Luis Vega

    BA, Art Education; MA, Curriculum and Instruction

    For the past 18 years, Luis Vega has focused on teaching art as communication, expression, creativity, and positive edification tool. He works hard to provide access to resources and create meaningful learning experiences for his students. Luis believes extending learning beyond the classroom builds confidence and provides experiences to learn 21st-century skills that are needed in many fields.

    Cristina Correa

    MFA in Visual Arts and Latin American Art History

    Cristina Correa teaches high school art, art history, and Mexican American Studies at IDEA College Preparatory San Juan, along the US/Mexico border in San Juan, TX. In addition to serving TAEA as Region 1 Representative, she is also a current TAEA Leadership Scholar, Art21 Educator, and TeachPlus Ready to Lead Fellow. Correa enjoys spending time with her son and cats when she is not teaching.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 11/02/2022 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [November 2, 2022 | 7pm ET] Looking for ways to help students to create, participate with, and respond to contemporary art and visual culture in more critical ways? Do you wonder how to support literacy in the art room though more than just writing prompts? Join us as we explore new media literacy—a discipline that features many elements analogous with art education. Come away with lessons, data, and techniques that will have your learners connecting their lived experiences with those of literary characters (from classics like Cinderella and new favorites like New Kid) and figures in popular culture through the avenue of digital comics, illustration, and more. Dive into exciting case study research (exploring Hamilton, Kehinde Wiley, and the Carters) and find ways you can successfully incorporate new media principles to support a different form of literacy in your teaching space.

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    What’s Your Story? Using Literacy and Art for Authentic Discovery
    Wednesday, November 2, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Looking for ways to help students to create, participate with, and respond to contemporary art and visual culture in more critical ways? Do you wonder how to support literacy in the art room though more than just writing prompts? Join us as we explore new media literacy—a discipline that features many elements analogous with art education. Come away with lessons, data, and techniques that will have your learners connecting their lived experiences with those of literary characters (from classics like Cinderella and new favorites like New Kid) and figures in popular culture through the avenue of digital comics, illustration, and more. Dive into exciting case study research (exploring Hamilton, Kehinde Wiley, and the Carters) and find ways you can successfully incorporate new media principles to support a different form of literacy in your teaching space.

    Matthew Pembleton

    MA, Art and Design Education (Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2019); BA Art Education (The College of New Jersey, 2012); Art Educator, Princeton High School 

    Matt Pembleton is a public school art educator and researcher from New Jersey. He is a studio art and AP Art History teacher at Princeton High School. His research centers on expanding and remixing art education using popular media, visual culture, and alternative epistemologies. Matt enjoys printmaking, miniature painting, and working with preservice teachers at The College of New Jersey.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/12/2022 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [October 12, 2022 | 7pm ET] We live in a world of change, inciting ever-evolving design trends and technologies requiring artists and designers to lead the way. Join us as we explore a wide range of creative career opportunities for students passionate about creating, making, building, and telling stories. The collaboration, creative problem-solving, critical-thinking, and entrepreneurial skills honed in art and design disciplines are transferrable and relevant to a wide range of industries, and can help launch successful and sustainable careers. As future seasoned design thinkers, these creatives are poised to find innovative and inventive solutions to meet the needs of the 21st century and beyond.

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    College and Career Pathways in Visual Arts, Design, and Media Arts
    Wednesday, October 12, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    We live in a world of change, inciting ever-evolving design trends and technologies requiring artists and designers to lead the way. Join us as we explore a wide range of creative career opportunities for students passionate about creating, making, building, and telling stories. The collaboration, creative problem-solving, critical-thinking, and entrepreneurial skills honed in art and design disciplines are transferrable and relevant to a wide range of industries, and can help launch successful and sustainable careers. As future seasoned design thinkers, these creatives are poised to find innovative and inventive solutions to meet the needs of the 21st century and beyond.

    Dale Clifford

    Dean of Academics 
    Savannah College of Art and Design, Atlanta Campus 

    Dale Clifford received a BFA from Miami University and an MFA from Clemson University. Clifford has been teaching in higher education since 1989. Clifford joined the Savannah College of Art and Design in 2002 and is currently the dean of academics at SCAD’s Atlanta campus.

    Laura Strikwerda

    Executive Director of Admission 
    Savannah College of Art and Design, Atlanta Campus

    Laura Strikwerda began her career in education more than 20 years ago. Since then, she has been a transfer adviser, a middle and high school teacher, and admission representative, the director of recruitment, and the director of admission enrollment. Strikwerda is now the executive director of admission for SCAD’s Atlanta campus. 

    Honor Bowman Hall

    Dean of the Schools of Fine Arts and Visual Communication 
    Savannah College of Art and Design

    Honor Bowman Hall is an artist living and working in Savannah, Georgia. Hall serves as dean of the Schools of Fine Arts and Visual Communication at the Savannah College of Art and Design, where she graduated with an MFA in painting in 2014. Her paintings appear in collections across the United States and abroad. 

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [September 7, 2022 | 7pm ET] Current political situations can be difficult for art educators to navigate. Join us as we explore practical strategies for teaching social justice through a K–12 lens. Discover ways to include all learners in the process of developing, creating, and presenting social justice artworks while incorporating inclusive communication strategies. Use this process to develop a proactive approach to teaching potentially uncomfortable topics while facilitating difficult conversations in the art room. A Library of Congress representative will also share how primary sources in their collections can be valuable teaching tools—photographs, newspaper articles, posters, correspondence, and more can capture student attention and provide historical points of entry into social justice topics that resonate today.

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    Careful Navigation: Social Justice in the Art Classroom 
    Wednesday, September 7, 2022 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Current political situations can be difficult for art educators to navigate. Join us as we explore practical strategies for teaching social justice through a K–12 lens. Discover ways to include all learners in the process of developing, creating, and presenting social justice artworks while incorporating inclusive communication strategies. Use this process to develop a proactive approach to teaching potentially uncomfortable topics while facilitating difficult conversations in the art room. 

    A Library of Congress representative will also share how primary sources in their collections can be valuable teaching tools—photographs, newspaper articles, posters, correspondence, and more can capture student attention and provide historical points of entry into social justice topics that resonate today. 

    Lee Ann Potter

    MA; Director of Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives, Library of Congress

    Lee Ann Potter leads a talented team at the Library of Congress committed to informing, inspiring, and engaging educators, librarians, and literacy champions by developing programs and materials largely based on primary sources. She directs the Library’s Teaching With Primary Sources grant program and the Literacy Awards program. She started her career as a high school social studies teacher.

    Kelly Hanning

    MS Ed; Art Educator, Gates Chili Central School District and Nazareth College, Rochester, New York

    Kelly Hanning is an artist and art educator in the Gates Chili School District, teaching kindergarten through 5th-grade students. She also adjuncts for Nazareth College’s Art and Design Department. She regularly presents at the New York State Art Teachers Association conference, as well as the National Art Education Association (NAEA) Convention. Kelly regularly exhibits her artwork locally and nationally.

    Amanda Wilmier

    MSEd; Art Educator

    Amanda Wilmier has taught preK–12 art at schools in New York, Georgia, and Virginia. Amanda attended Nazareth College in Rochester, New York, where she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in art education. She is an active member of NAEA and has presented at the National Convention twice. Amanda enjoys watching football and traveling with her fiancé.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.