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  • Lesson Plan: Solving the Art Puzzle [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    An artist may use Principles of Design the way a person might solve a puzzle—selecting each piece and examining it, comparing it with others, turning it, trying it out, moving it to another location—until it all comes together into one picture. These “clues” that unscramble the pieces are: Balance, Proportion, Contrast/Variety, Rhythm/Movement, Emphasis, Unity/Harmony, and Pattern. Students will build a puzzle with pieces based on the elements of art, then assemble them into a structure following the “clues” — the Principles of Design. Part of the structure will be selected as a focal point or area of emphasis, supported by other “clues” that guide the eye to it.

    If we think of art as a puzzle to be solved, there are individual pieces that an artist organizes and puts together to complete the entire image. 

    The individual pieces of the puzzle are called Elements of Art, and they are Line, Form, Shape, Texture, Color, Space, and Value.  

    An artist may use Principles of Design the way a person might solve a puzzle — selecting each piece and examining it, comparing it with others, turning it, trying it out, moving it to another location — until it all comes together into one picture. These “clues” that unscramble the pieces are: Balance, Proportion, Contrast/Variety, Rhythm/Movement, Emphasis, Unity/Harmony, and Pattern.  

    Students will build a puzzle with pieces based on the elements of art, then assemble them into a structure following the “clues” — the Principles of Design. Part of the structure will be selected as a focal point or area of emphasis, supported by other “clues” that guide the eye to it.  

    While any board could be used, balsa wood provides a rigid surface that is also soft enough to press texture into with just a pencil lead. It accepts watercolor and other media beautifully, plus it cuts easily with scissors. Finished “puzzles” will be substantive low-relief sculptures.  

    **GRADES 5-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: Veils of Light and Color [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    Overlapping film shapes create colorful compositions like plated glass — no glue required! This project is far simpler than producing stained glass-type artwork, where pieces fit together and are separated by lead lines. By eliminating those aspects of construction, students are free to use shape, value, and color as they like, with the added element of light to illuminate their creations. Clean and easy window art is produced on clear, adhesive film using colorful pieces of cellophane. As color layers over color, new hues are created. As layered pieces filter light, deeper values emerge.

    In speaking of the stained glass windows found in gothic-era European cathedrals, 19th century French architect Eugene Viollett-le-Duc referred to them as “veils of light and color...” These enormous works of art were often called “curtain walls,” designed to create a breathtaking display of the mystical and beautiful qualities of light. 

    Unbelievably, after the 16th century stained glass became almost a lost art. Because glass manufacturing was scarce, sometimes designers would layer two pieces of glass to produce the color or shade they wanted. 

    This technique — known as “plating” — was carried into England's Gothic revival and the Art Nouveau movement of the late 19th century. Some of L.C. Tiffany's famous windows used plating to produce deep values and a wide variety of colors, and give the illusion of greater depth in his compositions. 

    This project is far simpler than producing stained glass-type artwork, where pieces fit together and are separated by lead lines. By eliminating those aspects of construction, students are free to use shape, value, and color as they like, with the added element of light to illuminate their creations. Clean and easy window art is produced on clear, adhesive film using colorful pieces of cellophane. As color layers over color, new hues are created. As layered pieces filter light, deeper values emerge. 

    **GRADES K-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Lesson Plan: Welcome to my Hive [Presented by Blick Art Materials]

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    Build a “honeycomb” that credits those who keep the community humming. In a honey bee community, one can find a level of cooperation and collaborative teamwork that exists nowhere else on earth. In the human world, there are workers who keep the community humming along as well. In this lesson, students are asked to consider the people who provide services and necessities for them, then design a hexagon cell that represents their respective contribution. Cells can be connected to create a honeycomb-shaped display that expresses appreciation and recognition.

    In a honey bee community, one can find a level of cooperation and collaborative teamwork that exists nowhere else on earth. Each bee has an important role to play to guarantee the survival of the hive. Some bees work in food production, some in reproduction, some in raising the young, others as hive security officers — there are even bee housekeepers!  

    In the human world, there are workers who keep the community humming along as well. In this lesson, students are asked to consider the people who provide services and necessities for them, then design a hexagon cell that represents their respective contribution. Cells can be connected to create a honeycomb-shaped display that expresses appreciation and recognition.  

    The hexagon shape found in honeycomb cells forms a beautiful, strong, and consistent pattern. It's the most efficient shape because it requires the least amount of building material (beeswax) by sharing walls with each neighboring cell and leaving no space between. Each individual cell has a purpose and function.  

    With a bit of cutting, measuring, and folding, a 3-dimensional hexagon shape is easy to create from strips of sturdy paper or board. Younger ages can use a hexagon-shaped box as a stamp to create a 2 dimensional honeycomb pattern.  

    **GRADES 2-12** Note: Instructions and materials are based upon a class size of 24 students. Adjust as needed.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • 2019 NAEA National Convention Recordings

    Contains 15 Component(s), 14 Credit Hours offered

    Instant access to awesome sessions—FREE to NAEA members! Access videos of more than a dozen 2019 NAEA National Convention major sessions—Amy Sherald, Howard Gardner, Steve Locke, Peter H. Reynolds, and more! Engage in these informative, inspiring video sessions and earn professional development credit.

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    2019 NAEA National Convention Recordings

    Instant access to awesome sessions—FREE to NAEA members! Access videos of more than a dozen 2019 NAEA National Convention keynote sessions—Amy Sherald, Howard Gardner, Steve Locke, Peter H. Reynolds, and more! Watch these informative, inspiring video sessions and earn professional development credit.


    Featured Sessions:
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    Amy Sherald
    A Meditation on Photography, Painting, and Portraiture Painter
    Amy Sherald engages the historical legacies of photography and portraiture, centering her practice in the genre of American Realism.




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    Wanda B. Knight
    Charting a Course: May the Task Force Be  With You
    Meet the NAEA Task Force on Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion and learn about their recommendations as they chart a course leading to a more vibrant professional community that is richly diverse, inclusive, and open to all.



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    Rachel Branham
    Graphic Formats for Thematic Expression Rachel Branham

    In this research study, 30 sophomore art students search for effective graphic methods to convey thematic ideas.



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    Janet Echelman Artist Series Janet Echelman harnesses the creative power of the flexible, the soft, and the transparent through experiential sculptures, which have become inviting focal points for civic life.



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    Division Awards
    View the division awards ceremony for Elementary, Middle Level, Secondary, Higher Education, Preservice, Supervision/Administration, and Museum Education.



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    Steve Locke
    Artist Series

    Steve Locke is a Boston-based artist born in Cleveland, Ohio and raised in Detroit, Michigan.



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    Peter H. Reynolds
    One Brave Dot
    Artist and author Peter H. Reynolds shares lessons from his book, The Dot, as well as more recent and upcoming books.



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    Robb Sandagata, Emily Sandagata
    Separate Yet Entangled: Living and Working as Artists and Art Educators
    Two artists—one (also a teacher) creates sculptural paintings and painterly sculptures, the other creates grotesque narrative paintings—discuss their shared lives and shared experiences.



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    Yary Livan
    Artist Series
    Master Cambodian ceramist Yary Livan, a National Endowment for the Arts Heritage Fellow, presents his beautiful work and compelling story.



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    Kim Huyler Defibaugh 
    NAEA President
    Kim Defibaugh helps us gain perspective of the vast importance of our vibrant professional community and national awards are presented.



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    Howard Gardner
    Beyond Wit and Grit

    Drawing on decades of research in the arts and education, Dr. Howard Gardner describes an education framework that makes positive use of our wits and our good grit, and provides concrete suggestions about how to move toward a society that is both wise and caring.



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    Nathalie Miebach
    Weaving Science Data Into Sculpture and Music

    Nathalie Miebach translates scientific data related to ecology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography into woven sculptures and musical scores.



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    Myran Parker-Brass
    Building Equitable Access to Quality Arts Education: How Collective Action Is Revitalizing Arts Education in Boston
    Arts administrator, Myran Parker-Brass shares how equity, diversity, and inclusion is a driving goal in the work and success of Boston Public Schools.



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    Patty Bode & Others
    Curriculum with Criticality: Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

    See examples of curriculum units by presenters who address identity and prioritize inclusion in linguistic, religious, racial, ethnic, abilities, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic complexity.
  • Teaching Strategies to Support Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders in the Classroom

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    General education teachers, including special area teachers, often have a need for more extensive knowledge and understanding of children with specific disabilities. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is perhaps one of the more complex disabilities in the field of special education and represents a population of children who have great variability in their cognitive abilities, communication competencies, and behavioral and sensory needs. This webinar provides information that can help you to better understand children on the spectrum, supplying evidenced-based strategies that can be employed in the art classroom to provide a successful experience for all.

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    Teaching Strategies to Support Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders in the Classroom

    Wednesday, March 6, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    General education teachers, including special area teachers, often have a need for more extensive knowledge and understanding of children with specific disabilities. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is perhaps one of the more complex disabilities in the field of special education and represents a population of children who have great variability in their cognitive abilities, communication competencies, and behavioral and sensory needs. This webinar provides information that can help you to better understand children on the spectrum, supplying evidenced-based strategies that can be employed in the art classroom to provide a successful experience for all.

    Ruth Eren, EdD

    During her tenure at Southern Connecticut State University, most notably as holder of the first endowed chair in Southern’s 122-year history, Dr. Ruth Eren worked on the development of the master’s degree program in special education with a concentration in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. She was also cocreator of the Center of Excellence on Autism Spectrum Disorders. As a well-respected expert in her field, she served as a member of several state committees, contributing to essential work in ASD. She was appointed to the Connecticut State Department of Developmental Disabilities Autism Spectrum Disorder Advisory Council and served on several community-based advisory boards related to ASD.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Teaching the Gifted and Talented in Art

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    Do students with high ability get what they need in art class? What learning differences do the labels gifted and talented indicate and how can awareness of these differences improve art educational outcomes? Seldom are these questions addressed in preservice training or professional development, so join us for a multi-perspective, research-based overview that will prompt further inquiry. This webinar will help you fortify your philosophy of art education with recent findings, theories, and practices that support equitable accommodations for diverse students in elementary and secondary school art. Steve Heil will bring you up to date on principles of psychological science for teaching art to high-ability students. Roni Rohr will share her experience in delivering an enriched and accelerated approach to developing the talent of young artists.​ Join us and other art educators in exploring ways to facilitate every child’s growth and development in art.

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    Teaching the Gifted and Talented in Art

    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Do students with high ability get what they need in art class? What learning differences do the labels gifted and talented indicate and how can awareness of these differences improve art educational outcomes? Seldom are these questions addressed in preservice training or professional development, so join us for a multi-perspective, research-based overview that will prompt further inquiry. This webinar will help you fortify your philosophy of art education with recent findings, theories, and practices that support equitable accommodations for diverse students in elementary and secondary school art. Steve Heil will bring you up to date on principles of psychological science for teaching art to high-ability students. Roni Rohr will share her experience in delivering an enriched and accelerated approach to developing the talent of young artists. Join us and other art educators in exploring ways to facilitate every child’s growth and development in art.

    Steve Heil

    As a SAGE program specialist for Santa Fe Public Schools, Steve Heil helps culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse gifted and advanced students build on their abilities. As a New Mexico art educator, he has earned a New Mexico Golden Apple Foundation Award for Teaching Excellence, maintains his National Board Certification in early and middle childhood art, and serves on the council of the New Mexico Art Education Association. Heil also advocates for the needs of high-ability students as a member of the board of the New Mexico Association for the Gifted, an affiliate of the National Association for Gifted Children.

    Roni Rohr

    For the past 14 years Roni Rohr has shared her expertise in choice-based learning and design thinking with her students at El Dorado Community School in Santa Fe, NM. She also serves as the Santa Fe district's visual arts mentor for new and established teachers. Her many awards include New Mexico Golden Apple Awardee (2016), Middle School Art Educator of the Year (2015), Teacher Who Inspires (2011), and New Mexico Art Educator of the Year (2011). Rohr is a National Board Certified Teacher in early and middle childhood art and past president of NMAEA. Passionate about collaboration with New Mexico museums, Meow Wolf, and others as an educational consultant, creating emerging collaborative professional development.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Open Source Tech Tools to Use in the Art Room: A Pechakucha-Style Webinar!

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    This webinar contains valuable information about six different tools and is relevant for all art educators. Learn about one tool or all six. Your students will be glad you did.

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    Open Source Tech Tools to Use in the Art Room: A Pechakucha-Style Webinar!

    Wednesday, February 6, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    This six-part webinar contains valuable information for all art educators. Participate in one or all six. Your students will be glad you did.

    1. No Adobe? No Problem! | How to Create Vectors and Pixels Without Adobe Software. Interested in teaching digital media or graphic design skills to your students but are unable to use Adobe software (for budget or student at-home accessibility reasons or because you use Chromebooks)? This webinar segment, presented by Krisha Moeller, will provide you with an overview of how you can use Gravit Designer for vectors in place of Adobe Illustrator and Pixlr Editor for pixels in place of Adobe Photoshop. Other options for free, web-based, graphics programs will also be discussed.
    2. Open Source Tools for Fabrication. Digital fabrication opens up exciting opportunities for artists to bring machine creation and iteration to their artmaking process. With the availability of open-source software, designing with these tools has become affordable. Erin Riley hosts this webinar and will provide information on design and tool options artists can use with students in their studios and makerspaces.
    3. Quality Apps for Making Art With An iPad…But Wait! There’s More! They’re All Free! What is keeping you and your students from making art with iPads in school? If the price of apps for your large number of students is your reason, have no fear. Alice Matthews Gentili will show you apps that are short on cost (they’re free!) but mighty with possibility for drawing, painting, collage, and photo editing. With iPad and stylus in hand, nothing can stop you from getting your artmaking on!
    4. Generate Art With Scratch. Expect to be amazed! Computer programming is an art process, just like painting or drawing. Scratch is a free programming language that integrates art and storytelling. Artists who work with generative art create semiautonomous systems that share responsibility for the final artworks. Variations are expected but not predetermined, so the goal is to iterate on the results generated by the system—whether computational, mechanical, social, or a hybrid combination. Join Sean Justice as he shares valuable insight in this engaging session.
    5. Apps That Can Bring Engineering Into Art and Design Programs for Any Classroom. 3D fabrication can take many shapes, as long as you know the software that matches your students’ skill levels. Brandy Jackson shows you how to use TinkerCad, Fushion360, Google Drawings, and Inkscape to bring 3D designing to life in your classroom at no cost to you or your school.
    6. Creating Virtual Art and Spaces in Open Source Platforms: Students’ Art Projects in Virtual Worlds and Minecraft In her two National Art Education Foundation (NAEF) grant projects, Lilly Lu, PhD, explores the creation of virtual art and spaces with open source tech tools such as Opensim and Minecraft. They provide richer visual environment, more creative possibilities, and less expensive tech costs for digital artmaking. Lu will present student artwork created and exhibited in such platforms for formal and informal school settings and share her strategies and recommendations for future open source projects.
    7. Teaching Photography on a Title I Budget. Teaching students about photography should not be limited to those school systems who can afford dark rooms, computer labs, or expensive photographic equipment. With guidance from Carlos Alvin Cruz, learn how to use student-owned devices, tablets, digital SLRSs, and Chromebooks to explore the elements and principles of photography, while teaching students how to navigate different platforms and free apps to create digital artwork.

    Krisha Moeller

    Miss Moe has served as a graphic design and digital illustration teacher for 5 years (grades 9-12) in Southern California and has worked as an educational technology specialist for the past 2.5 years. She is also chair-elect of the Art Education Technology (AET) Interest Group for NAEA and always looking for new ways to support the meaningful use of technology within the ArtEd classroom!

    Erin E. Riley

    Erin Riley teaches students and facilitates faculty projects at the intersection of engineering, design, and art. She also teaches a studio course in creative technologies in the Department of Art and Art Education at Columbia University’s Teachers College. Erin is among the first cohort of Senior FabLearn Fellows at Stanford University, where she writes on the topic of maker education and curriculum design and creates tools and resources for educators. During the summer, Erin works with middle school–aged students on STEAM projects at REACHPrep, an educational access organization for underserved students. Erin’s forthcoming book The Art of Digital Fabrication will be published by Constructing Modern Knowledge Press.

    Alice Matthews Gentili, MEd

    Alice Gentili is in her twenty-first year in the Mendon-Upton Regional School District. In addition to her academic degrees, she holds certification in instructional technology and STEM. She uses iPads in the art classroom for 3D design, digital art, media art, and Google Classroom and is currently focused on developing project-based middle level STEAM curriculum for the maker-centered classroom. Gentili’s skill as an art educator has been widely recognized: the 2017 NAEA Eastern Region Art Educator of the Year, the 2017 NAEA/Art Education and Technology Outstanding Educator, the 2015 Massachusetts Art Educator of the Year, and the 2012 Massachusetts Middle School Art Educator of the Year.

    Sean Justice, EdDCT

    Sean Justice’s teaching and research address teacher education in the age of computing and digital networks. As an artist, he has exhibited photographs, videos, and computer animations both nationally and internationally. His book Learning to Teach in the Digital Age: New Materialities and Maker Paradigms in Schools was published in 2016 by Peter Lang. He also publishes regularly in art, education, and human development journals.

    Brandy Jackson M. Ed IT

    Brandy Jackson is a nationally recognized STEAM curriculum developer for grades k-8. In her role as integration specialist, she has developed a full makerspace, run multiple STEAM programs, and run community outreaches to support hands on making in the traditional classroom. As the owner and operator of Mobile MakerSpace Cape Cod, she brings these STEAM lessons to schools across New England.

    Lilly Lu, PhD

    Dr. Lilly Lu has a background in instructional technology and focuses her research on emerging art media, virtual worlds/virtual reality (creation and pedagogy), gaming (game design and play/game pedagogy), digital visual culture, and integrating new media/technology into art education. Two of her research projects were funded by grant awards from the National Art Education Foundation (NAEF) in 2008 and 2015.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Developing Your International Baccalaureate Art Program

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    How do comparative studies, process portfolios, and exhibitions translate into successful achievement in the visual arts? No, this isn’t a dissertation topic, but it is at the heart of a successful International Baccalaureate (IB) visual arts course in high school. Join us to discuss these modes of assessment and other philosophical questions about the nature of IB Visual Arts. You will also learn how to design a curricular program that addresses best practices for meeting the needs of advanced studio art learners and the IB program. Tune in to gain alternative perspectives as you generate your own knowledge and questions.

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    Developing Your International Baccalaureate Art Program
    Wednesday, January 16, 2019 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    How do comparative studies, process portfolios, and exhibitions translate into successful achievement in the visual arts? No, this isn’t a dissertation topic, but it is at the heart of a successful International Baccalaureate (IB) visual arts course in high school. Join us to discuss these modes of assessment and other philosophical questions about the nature of IB Visual Arts. You will also learn how to design a curricular program that addresses best practices for meeting the needs of advanced studio art learners and the IB program. Tune in to gain alternative perspectives as you generate your own knowledge and questions.

    Jackie Henson-Dacey, PhD

    Jackie Henson-Dacey teaches IB Visual Arts and AP Studio Art at Venice High School. Her expertise in International Baccalaureate programming, Advanced Placement qualifications, and gifted endorsement; high-level management skills; and experience with research-based instructional practices establish the core of her pedagogical programming. Seeking new knowledge and diving into scholarly endeavors have informed Henson-Dacey’s teaching for many years and contributed to the successful development of a comprehensive program at the high school level.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Calculating Success: Writing and Using Rubrics in the Art Room

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    Confused by the complexity of rubric design? Don’t know how to maximize rubric use to enhance student outcomes? Then this webinar is for you. We'll tackle rubric design by examining how project criterion is written and used by teachers and students in the art room. Did you know that many assessments classified as rubrics are merely checklists? Did students include this? Check. Did students cover that? Check. Sure, checklists and rubrics provide guidance on assessment, but rubrics do much more. A good rubric helps to shape student learning by clearly articulating the differences between levels of growth and performance. Students need this for a clearer understanding of what they need to do to move beyond initial responses and create work that pushes them to higher performance levels. Designing such a rubric takes time and requires feedback from colleagues and students. After participating in this webinar, you will be equipped to: recognize characteristics of effective rubric design; use rubrics for making and talking about works of art; create norms of understanding among your colleagues; align criterion with the National Core Visual Arts Standards; and write rubrics for assessment of learning and for grading.

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    Calculating Success: Writing and Using Rubrics in the Art Room  
    Wednesday, December 12, 2018 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Confused by the complexity of rubric design? Don’t know how to maximize rubric use to enhance student outcomes? Then this webinar is for you. We'll tackle rubric design by examining how project criterion is written and used by teachers and students in the art room. Did you know that many assessments classified as rubrics are merely checklists? Did students include this? Check. Did students cover that? Check. Sure, checklists and rubrics provide guidance on assessment, but rubrics do much more. A good rubric helps to shape student learning by clearly articulating the differences between levels of growth and performance. Students need this for a clearer understanding of what they need to do to move beyond initial responses and create work that pushes them to higher performance levels. Designing such a rubric takes time and requires feedback from colleagues and students. After participating in this webinar, you will be equipped to:

    • Recognize characteristics of effective rubric design
    • Use rubrics for making and talking about works of art
    • Create norms of understanding among your colleagues
    • Align criterion with the National Core Visual Arts Standards 
    • Write rubrics for assessment of learning and for grading


    Cam McComb, PhD

    Dr. Cam McComb brings the sensibility of the practitioner to her roles of artist, researcher, and teacher. She has 25+ years teaching art in the K-12 public schools and received National Board Certification (NBC) in early and middle childhood art (2006-2026). McComb credits the NBC process for highlighting the symbiotic relationship that exists between assessment and learning. Her doctoral research found that preadolescents value different aspects of the art making process and that they are capable of identifying and expressing their artistic needs. More recently, she coauthored “ Visualizing Cancer: A Transdisciplinary Art & Biology Collaborative,” which was published in the Journal of Teaching and Learning (2018). McComb is currently building strong relationships between teacher-candidates, licensed practicing art educators, and the university.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • The National Science Foundation Presents: Fostering STEAM—Combining Art and Science to Promote Equity

    Contains 1 Component(s), 1 Credit Hour offered

    Learn how STEAM—science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics—can promote equity and build identification with science and art! Discover a series of hands-on lessons that embody these principles by engaging students in content that covers art and science together. These activities connect the visual arts with biology, chemistry, and optics and, in turn, promote a STEAM mindset. Content is aligned with both art and science national standards.

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    The National Science Foundation Presents: Fostering STEAM—Combining Art and Science to Promote Equity
    Wednesday, November 7, 2018 | 7-8 pm ET
    FREE for NAEA Members; $49 for non-members

    Learn how STEAM—science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics—can promote equity and build identification with science and art! Discover a series of hands-on lessons that embody these principles by engaging students in content that covers art and science together. These activities connect the visual arts with biology, chemistry, and optics and, in turn, promote a STEAM mindset. Content is aligned with both art and science national standards.

    Laura Carsten Conner, PhD

    Laura Carsten Conner is research assistant professor at the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks. She is the former head of public programs at the University of Alaska Museum of the North, where she directed the development of exhibits and educational programs. She now leads and studies a number of out-of-school programs for youth, with a special interest in equity for girls and art-science connections. Laura enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, hiking, and reading Harry Potter books in her free time.

    Sarah Masterman, MEd

    Sarah Masterman has more than 20 years of teaching experience, working with students in grades 3 through 12. Throughout most of those years, science has been her primary focus, particularly for students in grades 4 through 8. She first learned about Colors of Nature—a project that emphasizes the connection of art and science and is supported by the National Science Foundation—when her daughter attended one of the first Colors of Nature camps in Fairbanks. She subsequently attended a workshop for teachers and made use of several of the Colors of Nature activities in her classes.

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