Monthly Webinar Archives

  • NAEA Advocacy Toolbox: #VisualArtsEdMatters

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Up your advocacy strategy in honor of National Arts in Education Week—September 10-16, 2017!

  • Teaching Creativity: Developing and Refining Student Ideas

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    How do we guide students through the processes of developing and refining their own creative ideas? Join us as we explore ideas and approaches for guided inquiry and concept mapping that are scalable for beginner or advanced-level students. Dive into the sustained investigation portion of the AP Art and Design portfolio as a lens for considering ideation as an ongoing and reflective practice that happens throughout the entire process of creating a body of work, not only at the outset.

  • Creating a Studio Environment: How to Implement Choice to Develop an Artistic Culture

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Have you considered a switch to Choice or TAB in the high school setting? From Level 1 to AP Art and Design, learn how one teacher successfully transitioned to a studio environment, inclusive of varied courses and levels, to create authentic and rich collaborative experiences. See multiple examples of both the philosophical journey and the nuts and bolts of trial and error in moving from teacher-directed projects to student-centered artwork. Also, learn how to advocate for your studio setup both in your department and beyond.

  • Folk Arts: Culture, Community, and Classroom

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    How can art educators assist learners in appreciating what makes the place where they live special? Discover how the folk arts are uniquely suited to explore how traditional art forms reflect the history, aesthetics, geography, and values of different cultures and communities. Art educators and folklorists Doug Blandy and Paddy Bowman will introduce participants to strategies and resources for integrating local folk arts into art education curricula associated with schools, museums, and community arts centers.

  • Differentiated Art Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Different teaching strategies are necessary for students with learning disabilities. However, all students can benefit from quality instruction that comes with the careful planning that goes into preparing these lessons. What does differentiated instruction actually look like for students with learning disabilities? Delve into support for the needs of students with language-based learning disabilities; processing and memory retention issues; cognitive impairments; attention deficit disorders; social/emotional challenges; and struggles with executive functioning. See concrete examples of what differentiated instruction looks like in high school digital art, photography, ceramics, and sculpture classrooms in order to connect with and meaningfully engage all learners, in a way that can be applied across grade levels and artistic media.

  • Valuing Student Diversity: Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Visual Arts Classroom

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    It is evident that growing diversity has had a significant impact on education in urban, rural, and suburban areas. Research and practice continues to demonstrate the need for strong teacher in-service and preservice programs to connect home, school, and community with culturally-relevant or culturally-responsive teaching strategies. This approach will not only expose students to diverse curriculum and best teaching practices but can encourage them to remain focused, become invested in what is happening, and actually step onto the road of academic success and social achievement. During this webinar, you will learn from examples of culturally responsive art instructional strategies, happening in K-16 environments. As the field of (art) education endeavors to become a culturally, socially and racially equitable system, educators often need a space to support their own developing professionalism around these issues. The aim of the presenters is to provide that space.

  • Working with Students Dealing with Trauma and Crisis: Stories from Art Teacher Survivors

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Research tells us that traumatic events are external, but they quickly become incorporated into the mind (Terr, 1990) and the body (Van der Kolk, 1991). In recent years, students have been affected by a variety of traumatic events—from high-profile school shootings to weather-related events, including fires, hurricanes, and tornadoes, to the opiate crisis and personal traumas. As art instructors, we are faced daily with students experiencing what might be the biggest fight of their lives. Two educators will relate stories of their own recent traumatic experiences and their efforts to help their students and families.

  • Building a Ceramics Program on a Low Budget: Creative Solutions for All Grade Levels

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Make your next clay unit a breeze (and an outstanding learning experience)! Explore curriculum and resources for utilizing the medium of clay to its fullest in your visual arts classroom. Leave this webinar with fresh ideas and creative tips for clay projects for all grade levels, materials, glaze usage and alternatives, using a kiln or air-drying clay, clay recycling, and storage.

  • Cultural [Mis]Appropriation: Permissions for Honoring Cultural Ownership in Art Education

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar explores how art educators can think through the permissions of cultural inclusion carefully, without erasing or stereotyping the often historically marginalized identities from which cultures originate. The presenters offer educators a framework that aligns with the NAEA Position Statement on the use of imagery, cultural appropriation, and socially just practices—intended to be a catalyst for respectful and relevant learning that makes connections to the realities or obstacles students may be facing. Supporting lessons and instructional strategies are transformative tools that are easily adapted to your context and presented in solidarity towards a greater shared understanding of individuals and cultures alike.

  • Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join three museum educators from the Smithsonian Institution to learn more about how digital museum resources at the new Smithsonian Learning Lab can support a more inclusive curriculum. From inquiry-based strategies in examining the American experience depicted through portraiture to unpacking the context of historical narratives communicated through art with your students, the Learning Lab holds potential for all grade levels. Teachers and students can create, customize, and adapt personal collections of resources, and use interactive tools to annotate resources noting details, pose discussion questions, and sort resources on a spectrum or categories to make connections between multiple artworks.